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FLOS

Mod.548 by Gino Sarfatti

$1,490
FLOS

Mod.548 by Gino Sarfatti

FLOH008055045

$1,490
Description
Designed in 1951 by Gino Sarfatti, the Model 548 is notable in the history of lighting design for its adjustable projector that directs the light towards a reflecting screen, polished brass supporting bar, and balance of different weights. But it is the large, cupped head that makes this iconic table lamp memorable: the cyan-hued crown of opaline methacrylate gives a sophisticated light diffusion effect. Flos’s reissue uses a LED source and replaces the original push-button switch with an optical dimming sensor, making it possible to adjust the level of brightness with a tap.
Detail
Color
Blue with polished brass
Materials
Brass, steel, methacrylate
Origin
Made in Italy
Dimensions
19.66 inches (width) x 19.66 inches (height)
Notes
  • Lightbulb included: LED 2700K 730 lm total CRI90 - 11W.
  • Cord length: 110 inches
Shipping & Returns

This item requires special delivery. We will contact you within one business day to discuss shipping arrangements and fees. Please contact us for a quote.

FLOH008055045

* This item requires special delivery.

Designed in 1951 by Gino Sarfatti, the Model 548 is notable in the history of lighting design for its adjustable projector that directs the light towards a reflecting screen, polished brass supporting bar, and balance of different weights. But it is the large, cupped head that makes this iconic table lamp memorable: the cyan-hued crown of opaline methacrylate gives a sophisticated light diffusion effect. Flos’s reissue uses a LED source and replaces the original push-button switch with an optical dimming sensor, making it possible to adjust the level of brightness with a tap. Designed in 1951 by Gino Sarfatti, the Model 548 is notable in the history of lighting design for its adjustable projector that directs the light towards a reflecting screen, polished brass supporting bar, and balance of different weights. But it is the large, cupped head that makes this iconic table lamp memorable: the cyan-hued crown of opaline methacrylate gives a sophisticated light diffusion effect. Flos’s reissue uses a LED source and replaces the original push-button switch with an optical dimming sensor, making it possible to adjust the level of brightness with a tap. Designed in 1951 by Gino Sarfatti, the Model 548 is notable in the history of lighting design for its adjustable projector that directs the light towards a reflecting screen, polished brass supporting bar, and balance of different weights. But it is the large, cupped head that makes this iconic table lamp memorable: the cyan-hued crown of opaline methacrylate gives a sophisticated light diffusion effect. Flos’s reissue uses a LED source and replaces the original push-button switch with an optical dimming sensor, making it possible to adjust the level of brightness with a tap. Designed in 1951 by Gino Sarfatti, the Model 548 is notable in the history of lighting design for its adjustable projector that directs the light towards a reflecting screen, polished brass supporting bar, and balance of different weights. But it is the large, cupped head that makes this iconic table lamp memorable: the cyan-hued crown of opaline methacrylate gives a sophisticated light diffusion effect. Flos’s reissue uses a LED source and replaces the original push-button switch with an optical dimming sensor, making it possible to adjust the level of brightness with a tap. Designed in 1951 by Gino Sarfatti, the Model 548 is notable in the history of lighting design for its adjustable projector that directs the light towards a reflecting screen, polished brass supporting bar, and balance of different weights. But it is the large, cupped head that makes this iconic table lamp memorable: the cyan-hued crown of opaline methacrylate gives a sophisticated light diffusion effect. Flos’s reissue uses a LED source and replaces the original push-button switch with an optical dimming sensor, making it possible to adjust the level of brightness with a tap.