• Notice

    The Line offers free shipping and returns on U.S. orders of $100 or more. International shipping is also available.

    Details

Sold Out / Call Store
Deborah Ehrlich

Rocks Glass

$55
Sold Out / Call Store
Deborah Ehrlich

Rocks Glass

DBEH001055045

$55
Description
An elevated essential. These exquisitely simple crystal tumblers began as sketches in the Hudson Valley, New York studio of Deborah Ehrlich. Renowned for merging contemporary forms with traditional techniques, the designer realizes her delicate shapes in strong, non-lead Swedish crystal that is hand-blown, hand-cut, and polished to a clear-as-water finish. “I work very, very slowly, just connecting dots on a piece of paper trying to find the most beautiful proportion,” Ehrlich has said. “I’m looking for a certain silence, a quiet.”
Detail
Color
Clear
Materials
Hand-blown, hand-cut, polished non-lead Swedish crystal
Dimensions
2.25" high x 3" wide
Weight
11 oz.
Shipping & Returns

The Line offers free shipping and returns on U.S. orders of most items. International shipping is also available. See our full shipping and return policies.

DBEH001055045

* This item may be available at The Apartment by The Line.

Chicago: +1 917 460 7195

Tuesday through Saturday: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sunday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Los Angeles: +1 323 746 5056

Monday–Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

New York: +1 917 460 7196

Monday–Saturday: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sunday: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Contact me when this becomes available online.

An elevated essential. These exquisitely simple crystal tumblers began as sketches in the Hudson Valley, New York studio of Deborah Ehrlich. Renowned for merging contemporary forms with traditional techniques, the designer realizes her delicate shapes in strong, non-lead Swedish crystal that is hand-blown, hand-cut, and polished to a clear-as-water finish. “I work very, very slowly, just connecting dots on a piece of paper trying to find the most beautiful proportion,” Ehrlich has said. “I’m looking for a certain silence, a quiet.” An elevated essential. These exquisitely simple crystal tumblers began as sketches in the Hudson Valley, New York studio of Deborah Ehrlich. Renowned for merging contemporary forms with traditional techniques, the designer realizes her delicate shapes in strong, non-lead Swedish crystal that is hand-blown, hand-cut, and polished to a clear-as-water finish. “I work very, very slowly, just connecting dots on a piece of paper trying to find the most beautiful proportion,” Ehrlich has said. “I’m looking for a certain silence, a quiet.” An elevated essential. These exquisitely simple crystal tumblers began as sketches in the Hudson Valley, New York studio of Deborah Ehrlich. Renowned for merging contemporary forms with traditional techniques, the designer realizes her delicate shapes in strong, non-lead Swedish crystal that is hand-blown, hand-cut, and polished to a clear-as-water finish. “I work very, very slowly, just connecting dots on a piece of paper trying to find the most beautiful proportion,” Ehrlich has said. “I’m looking for a certain silence, a quiet.” An elevated essential. These exquisitely simple crystal tumblers began as sketches in the Hudson Valley, New York studio of Deborah Ehrlich. Renowned for merging contemporary forms with traditional techniques, the designer realizes her delicate shapes in strong, non-lead Swedish crystal that is hand-blown, hand-cut, and polished to a clear-as-water finish. “I work very, very slowly, just connecting dots on a piece of paper trying to find the most beautiful proportion,” Ehrlich has said. “I’m looking for a certain silence, a quiet.” An elevated essential. These exquisitely simple crystal tumblers began as sketches in the Hudson Valley, New York studio of Deborah Ehrlich. Renowned for merging contemporary forms with traditional techniques, the designer realizes her delicate shapes in strong, non-lead Swedish crystal that is hand-blown, hand-cut, and polished to a clear-as-water finish. “I work very, very slowly, just connecting dots on a piece of paper trying to find the most beautiful proportion,” Ehrlich has said. “I’m looking for a certain silence, a quiet.”